Fwd: Next to the highway
From: Joaniblank (Joaniblankaol.com)
Date: Sat, 28 Jan 95 21:22 CST

Responding to Rita's question about a site very close to a freeway--(luckily
for you all, I don't know how to post direct quotes):

I would certainly be concerned about air quality at that site, but I have a
little different take on the noise situation. I think that cohousing can go a
long way to humanizing any residential property/site. Part of the reality of
living in the burbs these days are that some of the folks who live there have
to live close to freeways, or even (does anyone remember) railroad tracks.
And those who chose to live in an urban area--as I have--know that their
homes will be noisier than if they were farther from downtown. I know, I
know, the constant sound of freeway traffic is a sound of a different
type/stripe, but it is still a sound that most can learn to ignore,
particularly if signifigant mitigations are included in the design. 

Although I feel sure that many, perhaps most, cohousing groups will want
peace and tranquility at their site, there are a few of us excitement
junkies, who might actually be willing or even eager to trade increased noise
for the convenience, resources and hustle/bustle of an urban place, or even a
suburban one next to a freeway. Believe me, if I needed or wanted to live in
the suburbs, I'd sure rather do it in cohousing than any other way. 'Smatter
of fact, having lived in cohousing (Doyle St.) 2 1/2 years, I'm quite sure
I'll not ever want to live any other way, be it city, suburban or rural (at
the moment, my last choice).

Joani Blank
---------------------
Forwarded message:
Subj:    Next to the highway
Date:    95-01-28 22:08:05 EST
From:    Joaniblank
To:      couhousing-l [at] uci.com

Responding to Rita's question about a site very close to a freeway--(luckily
for you all, I don't know how to post direct quotes):

I would certainly be concerned about air quality at that site, but I have a
little different take on the noise situation. I think that cohousing can go a
long way to humanizing any residential property/site. Part of the reality of
living in the burbs these days are that some of the folks who live there have
to live close to freeways, or even (does anyone remember) railroad tracks.
And those who chose to live in an urban area--as I have--know that their
homes will be noisier than if they were farther from downtown. I know, I
know, the constant sound of freeway traffic is a sound of a different
type/stripe, but it is still a sound that most can learn to ignore,
particularly if signifigant mitigations are included in the design. 

Although I feel sure that many, perhaps most, cohousing groups will want
peace and tranquility at their site, there are a few of us excitement
junkies, who might actually be willing or even eager to trade increased noise
for the convenience, resources and hustle/bustle of an urban place, or even a
suburban one next to a freeway. Believe me, if I needed or wanted to live in
the suburbs, I'd sure rather do it in cohousing than any other way. 'Smatter
of fact, having lived in cohousing (Doyle St.) 2 1/2 years, I'm quite sure
I'll not ever want to live any other way, be it city, suburban or rural (at
the moment, my last choice).

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