Re: attached vs detached
From: em_genuity (em_genuityyahoo.com)
Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2007 05:12:54 -0700 (PDT)
Hello, 
I have never blogged' and don't live in co-housing, but am interested in it. 
But my thought is, if you are choosing co ho, you probably have to be okay with 
honestly facing interpersonal conflict, even if you don't know the neighbors 
all that well, the housing jusy seems set up for More real life encounters, for 
better or worse, so to speak. Is that most co ho's experience, that it can be 
more messy but if you face it it's much more rewarding than suburban isolation!?

Thanks,

e.e. 
Sent from my BlackBerry® wireless device

-----Original Message-----
From: Molly Lazar <mollyschaefer [at] yahoo.com>

Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2007 05:05:37 
To:Cohousing-L <cohousing-l [at] cohousing.org>
Subject: Re: [C-L]_ attached vs detached


Our neighborhood, Shadowlake Village in Blacksburg,  has a mixture of single 
family homes, duplexes, and townhomes.  Because my husband and I were some of 
the last buyers, we had to buy what was left-- a single family home.  Since 
then I have joked that I have "duplex envy."  Our neighbors who share a porch 
seem to have more fun.  They can have more spaces for hosting people and hang 
out together a lot.  It helped that most of the folks were friends with their 
duplexmates before move-in.  

Molly

On Jul 2, 2007, at 2:07 PM, James Kacki wrote:

> Does being so close cause
> interpersonal or societal conflicts that might not arise in detached
> housing.  (I understand the green (environmental) and energy  
> advantages
> of single building construction, but this question is about the
> interpersonal implications). Anyone in that type of co-housing care to
> comment?





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