Re: Common function areas in neighborhoods?
From: Richart Keller (richart.kellergmail.com)
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 06:25:28 -0700 (PDT)
I agree that the existence of a common space is not sufficient in itself to
build community (a necessary but not sufficient condition.).  However where
there is the intent, I am suggesting that a common facility can play a
central role in developing and maintaining the necessary relationships and
communication.

Rick.
On Aug 30, 2015 6:38 AM, "John Sechrest" <sechrest [at] gmail.com> wrote:

>
> I believe if you look closely, there are many places that have common
> facilities that are not Cohousing groups. There are retirement homes,
> assisted living facilities, apartment complexes, Student Housing and more
> that provide common facilities.
>
> However many of these places have the space, but not the community.
>
> That is... They have created the "Form" but they have not created the
> "Function".
>
> Specifically, I remember an apartment complex that we were looking at ,
> which had been newly built. It had a wide range "common facilities",
> including a "Movie Room", a Common Kitchen, Shared Laundry, and
> garden/public spaces.
>
> However, the feeling of community was not there.
>
> I suspect that you have to look beyond the facilities and space question ,
> into a deeper question of relationships and community. Sometimes, a shared
> space provides the function of nurturing and growing the relationships.
>
> I remember times and places where there were local communities of friends
> who shared each others houses. Where the children of the whole block would
> wander thru several houses in the the course of a day. That was a place
> which held community, even when there was no shared facilities.
>
>
>
> On Fri, Aug 28, 2015 at 9:43 AM, Richart Keller <richart.keller [at] 
> gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> >
> > Just a thought...
> >
> > One of the most important aspects of cohousing is the Common House.  It
> is
> > a key facility which differentiates cohousing from other types of
> housing,
> > neighborhoods, and communities.  By providing facilities in which
> residents
> > interact in various ways--including the mailroom,  the kitchen/dining
> area,
> > meeting rooms, laundry room, playroom for kids, etc. etc.--it is an
> > important vehicle for building and sustaining social capital within the
> > community.
> >
> > Are there ways in which such facilities could be provided within existing
> > or new neighborhoods or housing developments?
> >
> > Perhaps this would expand opportunities for building community and
> provide
> > an alternative to forming groups who are not able to gather enough folks
> to
> > create a full-blown cohousing community.
> >
> > Such facilities could also strengthen the sense of community in some
> > cooperative housing and other non-cohousing neighborhoods.  They might
> also
> > provide a way to strengthen affordable housing developments...
> >
> > Rick
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Rick Keller
> > Pioneer Valley Cohousing
> > Amherst MA
> > _________________________________________________________________
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> >
> >
> >
>
>
> --
> John Sechrest      .  Need to schedule a meeting :
> http://sechrest.youcanbookme.com
>                                    .
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>      sechrest [at] gmail.com
>                                                                        .
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>
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