Re: building industry (was Cohousing App)
From: Paul miller (paulmillersbcglobal.net)
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 22:54:53 -0700 (PDT)
As a 40 year Director of two large nonprofits, I strongly feel the willingness 
to accept low pay for staff and consultants institutionalizes the idea that the 
work is not valuable. However for staff it was easy to get information on 
market studies of salaries and benefits. We could get information on the market 
for lawyers by specialty and architects, etc. it appears difficult to know what 
to pay Cohousing consultants. I often felt that nonprofit management 
consultants were over paid.

Paul 

> On Jun 21, 2016, at 12:20 PM, Kathryn McCamant <kmccamant [at] 
> cohousing-solutions.com> wrote:
> 
> 
> I don’t think anyone expects to “make a killing” on cohousing. We’re just 
> talking about making a reasonable income for work provided. 
> 
> Katie 
> -- 
> Kathryn McCamant, President
> CoHousing Solutions
> 
> 241B Commercial Street 
> 
> Nevada City, CA 95959
> 
> T.530.478.1970  C.916.798.4755
> 
> www.cohousing-solutions.com
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On 6/20/16, 6:36 PM, "Cohousing-L on behalf of R Philip Dowds" 
> <cohousing-l-bounces+kmccamant=cohousing-solutions.com [at] cohousing.org on 
> behalf of rpdowds [at] comcast.net> wrote:
> 
> Many or most buildings go up without the ministrations of an architect.  Or 
> else, as adaptations of “spec” or “stock” plans bearing a licensed 
> architect’s stamp only because State codes require an “Architect of Record”.  
> Of all homes built, only a small percentage —2%? 3%? — count as original 
> custom designs tailored to the needs and desires of a specific household.  
> Truth be told, many or most families either cannot afford an architect, or 
> see an architect as an indulgence or luxury to be enjoyed only by the rich.  
> Architects, of course, dispute this view.  Nonetheless, architects earn 
> substantial incomes only when serving well-heeled clients like the 
> government, hospitals, casinos, or Bill Gates.
> 
> Looked at this way, it seems hard to anticipate a future where architects, 
> lawyers, or group dynamics consultants will make a killing in cohousing.
> 
> Philip Dowds
> Cornerstone Village Cohousing
> Cambridge, MA
> 
>> On Jun 20, 2016, at 6:17 PM, Kathryn McCamant <kmccamant [at] 
>> COHOUSING-SOLUTIONS.COM> wrote:
>> 
>> Eris, 
>> 
>> Interesting about “the vine” at PCBC….will be interesting to hear what you 
>> find. 
>> 
>> But really want to support you on your blog about getting paid. Maybe if one 
>> is a techie for income, or you do most of your work for big corporations 
>> that paid very well, you can afford to discount for special groups.  But 
>> those of us that have spent our entire careers in this realm of community 
>> and non-profits don’t have that luxury.  All of my clients are cohousing 
>> groups, and they are all cash poor and thinking they are poorer than 
>> everyone else. The reason I am so good at doing what I do is that I have 
>> spent decades working you groups and projects just like yours.  I’ve 
>> definitely hit the point where if its not worth it to you to paid my 
>> standard fees, then its not worth for me to do the work.  Ultimately, if we 
>> are going to change the world, there has to be a sustainable business models 
>> to support people doing this work. 
>> 
>> Katie 
>> -- 
>> Kathryn McCamant, President
>> CoHousing Solutions
> 
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