Re: WaPo article about aging without kids
From: Virgil Huston (virgil.huston1955gmail.com)
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 11:17:11 -0700 (PDT)
Liz,
I agree with everything you said. I would like to see communities that
are set up for end-of-life/long term health issue matters, while also
having all the options for active adults and families. This would
probably have to be set up by a non-profit or for-profit enterprise
and could even possibly provide jobs for residents and/or income. I
believe Europe has some things like this already. Like a personal care
home in the community, etc. I actually see this as a huge opportunity
for developers and investors on the corporate level.
Virgil

On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 10:01 AM, Elizabeth Magill <pastorlizm [at] gmail.com> 
wrote:
>
> Watching my in-laws refuse to be helped such that they are now stuck far away 
> and not healthy enough to be moved….(and my parents are younger but refusing 
> also to be helped.)
>
> and watching a coho neighbor refuse to be helped
>
> and then this message which I think says “I’d rather be homeless than have my 
> kids help me”
>
> suggests that part of the problem is that I need to learn how to let other 
> people do the help that they *can* do.
>
> At the same time, if I can’t pay my mortgage, or I can’t pay my condo fee, 
> and I haven’t made arrangements around that, I don’t see how the rest of the 
> coho community is supposed to rescue me? Should they use their own retirement 
> savings?
>
> If its just me that did that, I can’t imagine they’d kick me out for 
> non-condo fee payment (they would put a lien on the house get that money back 
> when the house is sold).
> But the bank will mostly certainly foreclose on me—which is not the 
> communities fault, right?
>
> But if 10 of us failed to pay our condo fee, the community couldn’t survive 
> without doing something to get paid.
>
> As a 55 year old adult without kids, my reaction to the WP article is that 
> I’m not sure what my friends can do if I become like my in-laws or parents. 
> Both that non-family can’t make medical decisions for me, can’t push me out 
> of my home, and if I won’t listen, they can’t make me accept the help I may 
> need.
>
> -Liz
> (The Rev.) Elizabeth M. Magill
> www.ecclesiaministriesmission.org
> www.mosaic-commons.org
> 508-450-0431
>
>
>
>
>> On Aug 25, 2016, at 10:44 PM, Virgil Huston <virgil.huston1955 [at] 
>> gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>
>> [snip]... I will be homeless (with my dog, that is essential). I completely 
>> agree
>> that we of a certain age need to plan for our old age and cohousing
>> with like minded people is attractive. However, I am not sure it is
>> the answer. I have seen stuff about old folks being basically kicked
>> out of cohousing because they can't contribute as they are expected
>> to. Or they can't afford the condo fees anymore. We need cohousing
>> that works from fully able adult to hospice. ….
>
>>> Aging Solo: Okay, I don’t have a child to help me, but I do have a plan
>>>
>>> https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/aging-solo-okay-i-dont-have-a-child-to-help-me-but-i-do-have-a-plan/2016/08/15/2af75e9a-49c7-11e6-90a8-fb84201e0645_story.html
>>>
>
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