Re: A very moving portrayal of the diversity element most
From: Tiffany Lee Brown (magdalen23gmail.com)
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 08:03:27 -0800 (PST)
ty, that’s really interesting. could you say more about how you imagine 
co-housing or other communities might best form in these different areas? would 
“diversity” in the Berkeley sense even be a goal of those communities? 

like the SNL “Bubble” skit i posted a link to on YouTube, sometimes 
communities, official community organizations, and housing options actually 
function to give folks a way to find likeminded people to hang out with. and 
sometimes likeminded ends up meaning a lot of people with the same religion, 
race, gender or gender preferences, general attitude toward life. do all 
communities need to be diverse? 

on my great-granny’s side, my family came from the Melungeon “race” in the 
Appalachians and included a Cherokee ancestor who ran off from the Trail of 
Tears. i’m out on the West Coast and have spent very little time in the South, 
so haven’t gotten to experience what you're talking about, other than some 
wonderful time spent in New Orleans and on a friend’s farm out on the Bayou. 
and painting any place with a wide brush can be misleading. even Berkeley. 
you’ll find many different subcultures/etc throughout areas of the West Coast 
that are assumed to be 100% enlightened progressive post-hippies, craft 
brewers, and tech kids. it just doesn’t get a lot of press because hey, for 
example, the Portlandia side of Portland is more interesting than the 85% of 
residents there who are similar to regular ol’ people in towns across the US. 
so folks assume that all Portlanders = Portlandia TV Show extras, and in many 
cases, they’re not at all.

cohousers at large: what do you think? is “diversity” of all opinions, 
subcultures, races, religions, values a true goal of your own organization, and 
in your mind, should it be a goal of co-housing at large? or are you more 
concerned with getting a diverse, larger pool of Americans interested in 
cohousing— but not necessarily try to shoehorn them all into the same actual 
cohousing community? 


thanks for offering your perspective…


tiffany



> On Dec 1, 2016, at 4:57 AM, Ty Albright <tmalbright [at] verizon.net> wrote:
> 
> 
> Re: 
> 
> Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 13:30:48 -0500
> 
> From: David Heimann <heimann [at] theworld.com>
> 
> To: cohousing-l [at] cohousing.org
> 
> Subject: [C-L]_ A very moving portrayal of the diversity element most
> 
>          difficult to include in cohousing
> 
> Message-ID: <Pine.SGI.4.61.1611301311310.4390983 [at] shell01.theworld.com>
> 
> Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> www.nybooks.com/articles/2016/11/10/american-right-inside-the-sacrifice-zone
> 
> 
> 
> Thanks for sharing, this is a good first attempt but I must share that when
> reading this article I was reminded of the African Safari ride at Disney
> Land, it's like someone from a faraway land with a pith helmet showed up in
> Louisiana and came back home with amazing stories, and quite a bit of
> misinterpretation.  Overall, a good attempt from an "Berkeley Outsider" -
> and the article does demonstrate that not every place in this country is the
> same.
> 
> 
> 
> This story speaks about the Tea Party's as if it were some sort of actual
> real organized political party.  It's not, and I do not know anyone who
> refers to "the tea party" as something they belong to.  I believe this is
> just an easy label some have come up with to explain a grass roots belief
> system that has rejected the institutional political parties (both democrats
> and republicans).
> 
> 
> 
> Culturally I must tell you that Southern Louisiana is a very unique place,
> and cannot be directly compared to the rest of the Deep South, and certainly
> not the mid-west.  There was a time in this country's founding where many
> languages other than English were spoken, and they still speak creole in
> parts of Louisiana; they also have some great Cajun food, Zydeco music and
> friendly people (just don't show up unannounced or you risk getting shot).
> 
> 
> 
> If anyone wants to better understand about the culture of the Deep South I
> recommend the documentary "Searching for the Wrong-Eyed Jesus" 
> 
> 
> 
> But beware, that regionally there are great cultural differences in fly over
> country. Southern Louisiana is uniquely different from the Deep South, as is
> the true mid-west, as is Texas, as is Oklahoma (formally Indian territory
> where Andrew Jackson forcefully relocated multiple people groups to make
> room for white settlement).  I believe these different sub-cultures are why
> many still believe in the importance of "State Rights".
> 
> 
> 
> From a cohousing perspective - these different cultures, in my opinion,
> require a different approach for "forming community" than what may typically
> work in other locations.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Ty
> 
> Ty Albright Project Management
> Little Red Hen LLC
> 214-336-7952
> <mailto:tmalbright [at] verizon.net> tmalbright [at] verizon.net
> <http://www.linkedin.com/in/tmalbright> www.linkedin.com/in/tmalbright
> 
> 
> 
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