Homes available Pleasant Hill Coho
From: Terri Hupfer (terriphch.org)
Date: Sun, 8 Jul 2018 11:43:38 -0700 (PDT)
Homes available at Pleasant Hill Cohousing in Bay Area, Ca

We currently have two units for rent and two larger homes coming up for sale. 
Just like Takoma the graduation of our children is resulting in moves for some 
families.
Please check website:
Phch.org
If interested.
Terri Hupfer
PHCH

> 
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> Today's Topics:
> 
>   1. Re: Questions About Reserve Amounts (Alan O'Hashi)
>   2. The kids are growing up (Sandy Thomson)
>   3. Re: Questions about Reserve Amounts (Joseph Wheeler)
>   4. Re: Questions about Reserve Amounts (Philip Dowds)
>   5. Re: Questions about Reserve Amounts (Joseph Wheeler)
>   6. Re: Questions about Reserve Amounts (Sharon Villines)
>   7. Re: Questions about Reserve Amounts (Bob Leigh)
>   8. Re: Questions about Reserve Amounts (Sharon Villines)
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Message: 1
> Date: Sun, 8 Jul 2018 13:06:41 +0000 (UTC)
> From: Alan O'Hashi <adoecos [at] yahoo.com>
> To: "cohousing-l [at] cohousing.org" <cohousing-l [at] cohousing.org>,  Ann
>    Lehman <ann [at] zimmerman-lehman.com>
> Subject: Re: [C-L]_ Questions About Reserve Amounts
> Message-ID: <892156780.682854.1531055201229 [at] mail.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
> 
> Annie - We're starting the grueling dues assessment formula re-evaluation 
> process. I'm gearing up for lots of brain damage!
> 
> This is a topic that's been discussed on this list, apparently, since the 
> 1990s. If you search the data base, lots will come up.
> 
> I summarized the crowdsourced info I received. If interested, here's the 
> download link:
> 
> https://bit.ly/2J5A28S?
> 
> 
> Alan O.
> 
> 
> 
> Alan O'Hashi - ECOS
> EnviroCultural Organization Systems
> http://www.alanohashi.com/ecos
> Colorado 303-910-5782
> Wyoming 307-274-1910
> Nebraska 402-327-1652
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 2
> Date: Sun, 8 Jul 2018 08:00:01 -0600
> From: Sandy Thomson <sandykthomson [at] gmail.com>
> To: cohousing-l [at] cohousing.org
> Cc: Dave & Sue Austin <antwren [at] gmail.com>, Scott Fallows
>    <scott_fallows [at] yahoo.com>, Sondra Joyce <sondra [at] 
> rejoycerealestate.com>
> Subject: [C-L]_ The kids are growing up
> Message-ID: <CA6E5BF5-D357-4E94-A8E7-DD2BFEBDD1C2 [at] gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain;    charset=us-ascii
> 
> We have 3 family sized homes available right now at Heartwood for sale and 
> one of those is available to rent.   Our first generation of kids are in 
> college now and we have some homes just aching for some families to move in.  
> Check out what is available here  
> http://www.heartwoodcohousing.com/for-rent.html
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 3
> Date: Sun, 8 Jul 2018 11:44:01 -0400
> From: Joseph Wheeler <wheeler76 [at] gmail.com>
> To: cohousing-l [at] cohousing.org
> Subject: Re: [C-L]_ Questions about Reserve Amounts
> Message-ID:
>    <CAN3_R62KovsKobui+koGawmpW2E4_eeea6kWF8dzqWJxx8yCcA [at] mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
> 
> At Takoma Village, we have tried to gradually increase our reserve
> contributions every year.
> 
> Our 2018 budget provides for about $235,000 in income from condo fees. (We
> also have about $5000 income from voluntary contributions for guest room
> use that go into our general operating funds, about $3000 interest income
> on our reserves that we reinvest in the reserves, and contributions from
> departing members that go into a separate "special projects" reserve.)
> 
> We contribute almost half of the annual income from condo fees to our
> replacement reserve ($93,000) or maintenance reserve ($22,000). In our 18
> years of operation, we have never had to ask members to pay a special
> assessment.
> 
> With 43 units of varying sizes, our monthly condo fees range from $357-638
> with the average being about $455. Of that average fee, about $223 would go
> to reserve accounts.
> 
> We have commissioned a reserve study every 3-4 years and those studies
> inform our budget process. Our most recent study recommended continuing to
> increase reserve contributions about 5-6% per year to avoid risk of special
> assessments.
> 
> The basic formula for calculating our condo fees is that 1/2 is split
> evenly among all the units and 1/2 is variable based on square footage of
> the unit.
> 
> -Joe Wheeler
> Takoma Village Cohousing
> Washington, DC
> 
>> On Fri, Jul 6, 2018 at 9:06 PM, Ann Lehman <ann [at] zimmerman-lehman.com> 
>> wrote:
>> 
>> Dare I open this conversation up? No need to share horror stories I'm just
>> looking for what it's typical.......If you are ok with sharing....
>> 
>> 1) I am curious what different communities put into their reserves each
>> year (total & average per unit/per month) for reserves?
>> 
>> 2) Is this amount = or greater than 10 % of your yearly budget?
>> 
>> 3) Was this based on a reserve study?
>> 
>> 4) If no reserve study what is based on?
>> 
>> 5) How old your main buildings?
>> 
>> 6) How is this divided up? Based on sq ft? The number of people?
>> Combination? Household?
>> 
>> Heads Up, I will be out of the country for a few weeks but thought I would
>> get this conversation going so I could follow up when I return.
>> 
>> Annie
>> 
>> Ann Lehman
>> Governance and Gender Consultant
>> Zimmerman Lehman*forging futures for nonprofits
>> **http://zimmerman-lehman.com/ <http://zimmerman-lehman.com/>
>> *510.755.5701 (Mobile)*National Cohousing Conference, May30-June2,
>> 2019, Portland, OR*
>> 
>> 
>> ENEWS Subscribe to our free e-newsletter,ZimNotes
>> <http://www.zimmerman-lehman.com/subscribe.htm> or find us on:
>> 
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>> _________________________________________________________________
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>> 
>> 
>> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> peace, joe
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 4
> Date: Sun, 08 Jul 2018 11:53:03 -0400
> From: Philip Dowds <rphilipdowds [at] me.com>
> To: Cohousing-L <cohousing-l [at] cohousing.org>
> Subject: Re: [C-L]_ Questions about Reserve Amounts
> Message-ID: <6523AF81-1032-4689-830A-147E9F1CDDA1 [at] me.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain;    charset=utf-8
> 
> But, is that not regressive?  The latter component, proportionate to sq ft, 
> is roughly correlated unit value (itself roughly correlated to household 
> wealth), and number of occupants in the unit (roughly correlated to burden on 
> the commons).  But the former component ? one price fits all for both 1 
> person in a small one bedroom, and 4 persons in a three bedroom ? falls more 
> heavily on the small household.  What reasoning led to this outcome?
> 
> Thanks,
> RPD
> 
>> On Jul 8, 2018, at 11:44 AM, Joseph Wheeler <wheeler76 [at] gmail.com> wrote:
>> 
>> The basic formula for calculating our condo fees is that 1/2 is split
>> evenly among all the units and 1/2 is variable based on square footage of
>> the unit.
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 5
> Date: Sun, 8 Jul 2018 12:40:07 -0400
> From: Joseph Wheeler <wheeler76 [at] gmail.com>
> To: cohousing-l [at] cohousing.org
> Subject: Re: [C-L]_ Questions about Reserve Amounts
> Message-ID:
>    <CAN3_R61EZTeXL_jJ-xhpp9Og_G=76uovaBwMUseyFL4Q4KQnPQ [at] mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
> 
> I can't speak to the thinking that went into the formula at the time Takoma
> Village was founded because I wasn't around, but I think it is a somewhat
> standard formula that seeks to balance some of the unequal costs/benefits
> attributable to the different sizes of units with each unit owner's equal
> access to common elements (the latter being a more significant factor in
> cohousing than in other condos). I'm sure there are different ways to
> balance these interests and further minimize regressiveness of fees. I
> haven't thought through the options enough to argue in favor of this or
> some alternate as the preferred approach.
> 
> -Joe Wheeler
> Takoma Village Cohousing
> Washington, DC
> 
> 
> On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 11:53 AM, Philip Dowds via Cohousing-L <
> cohousing-l [at] cohousing.org> wrote:
> 
>> But, is that not regressive?  The latter component, proportionate to sq
>> ft, is roughly correlated unit value (itself roughly correlated to
>> household wealth), and number of occupants in the unit (roughly correlated
>> to burden on the commons).  But the former component ? one price fits all
>> for both 1 person in a small one bedroom, and 4 persons in a three bedroom
>> ? falls more heavily on the small household.  What reasoning led to this
>> outcome?
>> 
>> Thanks,
>> RPD
>> 
>>> On Jul 8, 2018, at 11:44 AM, Joseph Wheeler <wheeler76 [at] gmail.com> 
>>> wrote:
>>> 
>>> The basic formula for calculating our condo fees is that 1/2 is split
>>> evenly among all the units and 1/2 is variable based on square footage of
>>> the unit.
>> 
>> _________________________________________________________________
>> Cohousing-L mailing list -- Unsubscribe, archives and other info at:
>> http://l.cohousing.org/info
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> peace, joe
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 6
> Date: Sun, 8 Jul 2018 14:05:54 -0400
> From: Sharon Villines <sharon [at] sharonvillines.com>
> To: Cohousing-L <cohousing-l [at] cohousing.org>
> Subject: Re: [C-L]_ Questions about Reserve Amounts
> Message-ID: <1F2F449D-2DD8-4E47-A2F5-C19D0DD187BD [at] sharonvillines.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain;    charset=utf-8
> 
> To respond to Philip?s question based on Joe?s excellent figures ? the costs 
> of maintaining, repairing, and replacing the commonly owned elements are not 
> particularly related to how many people live in a unit. The cost of the unit 
> should include an evaluation of the reserve funds. Healthy reserves, higher 
> prices. Low reserves, lower prices and greater risk.
> 
> The reasoning behind the condo fee 50/50 split was that some elements are 
> equal between units ? we all have one parking space, for example. Parking is 
> expensive. It is unlikely that a large unit would use the CH more than a 
> small unit ? the guest rooms are more likely to be used by small units.
> 
> But in fact, our large units do not necessarily have more people in them. We 
> have a 4br with a full basement with 1 person, and a 3br with a full basement 
> with one person. For years we had a 1 bedroom with a single parent and child. 
> And a one bedroom with a single parent and 2 children.  Size of unit is not 
> necessarily related to the number of people living in the unit. Most of our 2 
> bedrooms have 1 person.
> 
> Another way to look at the reserves is to divide by the number of units ? 
> $93,000/43= ~$180 a month per unit. It seems like a lot but it also covers a 
> lot. It has been a great comfort not to have to worry about replacing the 
> HVAC system or replacing the roof when we were able to add solar panels.
> 
> Having a reserve study with a graph of expenses at least 50 years out?ours 
> goes 100 yrs?makes it much easier to convince residents that we need to have 
> that much in reserves.
> 
> Sharon
> 
>> On Jul 8, 2018, at 11:44 AM, Joseph Wheeler <wheeler76 [at] gmail.com> wrote:
>> 
>> We contribute almost half of the annual income from condo fees to our
>> replacement reserve ($93,000) or maintenance reserve ($22,000). In our 18
>> years of operation, we have never had to ask members to pay a special
>> assessment.
>> 
>> With 43 units of varying sizes, our monthly condo fees range from $357-638
>> with the average being about $455. Of that average fee, about $223 would go
>> to reserve accounts.
>> 
>> We have commissioned a reserve study every 3-4 years and those studies
>> inform our budget process. Our most recent study recommended continuing to
>> increase reserve contributions about 5-6% per year to avoid risk of special
>> assessments.
>> 
>> The basic formula for calculating our condo fees is that 1/2 is split
>> evenly among all the units and 1/2 is variable based on square footage of
>> the unit.
>> 
>> -Joe Wheeler
>> Takoma Village Cohousing
>> Washington, DC
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 7
> Date: Sun, 8 Jul 2018 14:16:46 -0400
> From: Bob Leigh <bobleigh [at] twomeeps.com>
> To: cohousing-l [at] cohousing.org
> Subject: Re: [C-L]_ Questions about Reserve Amounts
> Message-ID:
>    <CAKbQ-o6=ia1o45FtHMfMQL0zjEG4J=uTkoZ+TYpqHKfQr3xERg [at] mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
> 
> How have other communities coped with the argument that current residents
> should not have to contribute to a new roof that they might not be around
> to use?
> 
> Bob Leigh
> Cornerstone Village Cohousing
> Cambridge, Massachusetts US
> 
> On Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 2:06 PM Sharon Villines via Cohousing-L <
> cohousing-l [at] cohousing.org> wrote:
> 
>> To respond to Philip?s question based on Joe?s excellent figures ? the
>> costs of maintaining, repairing, and replacing the commonly owned elements
>> are not particularly related to how many people live in a unit. The cost of
>> the unit should include an evaluation of the reserve funds. Healthy
>> reserves, higher prices. Low reserves, lower prices and greater risk.
>> 
>> The reasoning behind the condo fee 50/50 split was that some elements are
>> equal between units ? we all have one parking space, for example. Parking
>> is expensive. It is unlikely that a large unit would use the CH more than a
>> small unit ? the guest rooms are more likely to be used by small units.
>> 
>> But in fact, our large units do not necessarily have more people in them.
>> We have a 4br with a full basement with 1 person, and a 3br with a full
>> basement with one person. For years we had a 1 bedroom with a single parent
>> and child. And a one bedroom with a single parent and 2 children.  Size of
>> unit is not necessarily related to the number of people living in the unit.
>> Most of our 2 bedrooms have 1 person.
>> 
>> Another way to look at the reserves is to divide by the number of units ?
>> $93,000/43= ~$180 a month per unit. It seems like a lot but it also covers
>> a lot. It has been a great comfort not to have to worry about replacing the
>> HVAC system or replacing the roof when we were able to add solar panels.
>> 
>> Having a reserve study with a graph of expenses at least 50 years out?ours
>> goes 100 yrs?makes it much easier to convince residents that we need to
>> have that much in reserves.
>> 
>> Sharon
>> 
>>> On Jul 8, 2018, at 11:44 AM, Joseph Wheeler <wheeler76 [at] gmail.com> 
>>> wrote:
>>> 
>>> We contribute almost half of the annual income from condo fees to our
>>> replacement reserve ($93,000) or maintenance reserve ($22,000). In our 18
>>> years of operation, we have never had to ask members to pay a special
>>> assessment.
>>> 
>>> With 43 units of varying sizes, our monthly condo fees range from
>> $357-638
>>> with the average being about $455. Of that average fee, about $223 would
>> go
>>> to reserve accounts.
>>> 
>>> We have commissioned a reserve study every 3-4 years and those studies
>>> inform our budget process. Our most recent study recommended continuing
>> to
>>> increase reserve contributions about 5-6% per year to avoid risk of
>> special
>>> assessments.
>>> 
>>> The basic formula for calculating our condo fees is that 1/2 is split
>>> evenly among all the units and 1/2 is variable based on square footage of
>>> the unit.
>>> 
>>> -Joe Wheeler
>>> Takoma Village Cohousing
>>> Washington, DC
>> _________________________________________________________________
>> Cohousing-L mailing list -- Unsubscribe, archives and other info at:
>> http://l.cohousing.org/info
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 8
> Date: Sun, 8 Jul 2018 14:30:04 -0400
> From: Sharon Villines <sharon [at] sharonvillines.com>
> To: Bob Leigh <bobleigh [at] twomeeps.com>, Cohousing-L
>    <cohousing-l [at] cohousing.org>
> Subject: Re: [C-L]_ Questions about Reserve Amounts
> Message-ID: <AF0B2B3C-670F-4B25-AF49-9E407ED3F932 [at] sharonvillines.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain;    charset=utf-8
> 
>> On Jul 8, 2018, at 2:16 PM, Bob Leigh <bobleigh [at] twomeeps.com> wrote:
>> 
>> How have other communities coped with the argument that current residents 
>> should not have to contribute to a new roof that they might not be around to 
>> use?
> 
> Because a dilapidated property won?t sell and is expensive to live in. The 
> reserve fund is actually named a Capital Reserve Fund. It is designed to 
> preserve your capital ? your investment. Every time something is not repaired 
> or repaired cheaply, the value of the property goes down. No one (smart) 
> moves in and those still there can?t afford to move because they can?t get 
> market prices that would allow them to move.
> 
> Who would move into a community that needed the roof replaced and had no 
> savings to do it?
> 
> A buyer should see a reserve study that informs them how well the condo is 
> funded and whether they have done the things needed to properly maintain the 
> property, and whether the HVAC is about to go out but there is money to 
> replace it.
> 
> Money to replace should also include enough to replace at or above current 
> market expectations.
> 
> We are saving for our own futures.
> 
> Sharon
> ----
> Sharon Villines
> Takoma Village Cohousing, Washington DC
> http://www.takomavillage.org
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Subject: Digest Footer
> 
> _________________________________________________________________
> Cohousing-L mailing list -- Unsubscribe, archives and other info at:
> http://l.cohousing.org/info
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of Cohousing-L Digest, Vol 174, Issue 10
> ********************************************

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