Re: Misuse of the cohousing word - again
From: Lynne Markell (lmarkellrogers.com)
Date: Thu, 6 Dec 2018 16:30:41 -0800 (PST)
Good for you for doing this. We know what cohousing is and differentiate it 
from co-living. 
 The one good thing about co-living in a big house or developer-built is that 
it is faster to start than cohousing.
Lynne 

Lynne Markell, 
Lmarkell [at] rogers.com
(613) 842-5222



> On Dec 6, 2018, at 7:14 PM, Becca Brackett <ecbrackett [at] cohousing.org> 
> wrote:
> 
> I decided to write to Emilie Raguso of the Berkeleyside news about an article 
> she wrote Dec 4, 2018. It is about a proposed very dense housing building to  
> replace a gas station. It is NOT cohousing but the word co-housing is used.  
> The building is to have 80 bedrooms in 23 units, and a few small common areas 
> - Not a community.
> 
> the headline reads:  Council approves South Berkeley co-housing units after 
> zoning board denial.
> 
> here is the article:
> 
> http://s.coop/densehousing
> 
> Here is what I wrote to her:
> 
> Dear Emilie Raguso,
> 
> I am from Minneapolis,  but I just had to comment about the use of the word  
> "co-housing"  in your article.
> I have a "google alert" on the word cohousing and that service brought your 
> article to my attention. It appears from the article that what  is planned is 
> Co-living. The units available individually, without any intentional 
> community organization, and later in your article  you do use "Co-living"  
> which I think is a more appropriate word choice. Even though  you used a dash 
> for co-housing,  I am hoping that you will not use it in future for such a 
> building.
> 
> I am a big fan of the concept ( cohousing )  brought to the USA from Denmark 
> in the 1990's, AND hate to see it confused with other types of housing 
> developments.
> The wikipedia article on cohousing  ( no hyphen included) 
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cohousing, defines  cohousing as a  " 
> an__intentional community 
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intentional_community>__ of private homes 
> clustered around shared space. Each attached or single family home has 
> traditional amenities, including a private kitchen. Shared spaces typically 
> feature a common house, which may include a large kitchen and dining area, 
> laundry, and recreational spaces. Shared outdoor space may include parking, 
> walkways, open space, and gardens. Neighbors also share resources like tools 
> and lawnmowers. Households have independent incomes and private lives, but 
> neighbors collaboratively plan and manage community activities and shared 
> spaces. The legal structure is typically a homeowner association 
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeowner_association> or housing cooperative 
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Housing_cooperative>. "
> 
> Berkeley DOES have some actuI decided to write to Emilie Raguso of the 
> Berkeleyside news about an article she wrote Dec 4, 2018. It is about a 
> proposed very dense housing building to  replace a gas station. It is NOT 
> cohousing but the word co-housing is used.  The building is to have 80 
> bedrooms in 23 units, and a few small common areas - Not a community.
> 
> the headline reads:  Council approves South Berkeley co-housing units after 
> zoning board denial.
> 
> here is the article:
> 
> http://s.coop/densehousing
> 
> Here is what I wrote to her:
> 
> Dear Emilie Raguso,
> 
> I am from Minneapolis,  but I just had to comment about the use of the word  
> "co-housing"  in your article.
> I have a "google alert" on the word cohousing and that service brought your 
> article to my attention. It appears from the article that what  is planned is 
> Co-living. The units available individually, without any intentional 
> community organization, and later in your article  you do use "Co-living"  
> which I think is a more appropriate word choice. Even though  you used a dash 
> for co-housing,  I am hoping that you will not use it in future for such a 
> building.
> 
> I am a big fan of the concept ( cohousing )  brought to the USA from Denmark 
> in the 1990's, AND hate to see it confused with other types of housing 
> developments.
> The wikipedia article on cohousing  ( no hyphen included) 
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cohousing, defines  cohousing as a  " 
> an__intentional community 
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intentional_community>__ of private homes 
> clustered around shared space. Each attached or single family home has 
> traditional amenities, including a private kitchen. Shared spaces typically 
> feature a common house, which may include a large kitchen and dining area, 
> laundry, and recreational spaces. Shared outdoor space may include parking, 
> walkways, open space, and gardens. Neighbors also share resources like tools 
> and lawnmowers. Households have independent incomes and private lives, but 
> neighbors collaboratively plan and manage community activities and shared 
> spaces. The legal structure is typically a homeowner association 
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeowner_association> or housing cooperative 
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Housing_cooperative>. "
> 
> Berkeley DOES have some actual cohousing - "Berkeley Cohousing" is its name 
> and their webpage is _https://www.cohousing.org/Berkeley%20Cohousing. 
> _Cohousing groups form BEFORE  construction and as a group contribute to the 
> planning and Architectural choices. After construction they self manage their 
> community._
> _
> 
> Thanks  for considering this issue,
> 
> Becca Brackett--
> 
> 
> -- 
> Becca Brackett: Bassett Creek Cohousing member,
> http://BassettCreek.us      612-588-9532
> I am a retired MD, Unitarian Humanist!
> I am quilter, gardener, and naturalist.
> 
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